Close cookies panel

We use cookies to give you the best possible online experience.

If you continue, we'll assume you are happy for your web browser to receive all cookies from our website.

10 things you might not know about the Canary Islands

Posted by Luci Ackers on 5 December 2016
Related property: Santa Rosa
10 things you might not know about the Canary Islands

1. There are seven islands in total:

El Hierro, Fuerteventura, Gran Canaria, La Gomera, Lanzarote, La Palma and Tenerife. Tenerife is the biggest of the group. Together these seven Canary Islands form the small archipelago that lies in the North Atlantic Ocean to the south of Spain.

2. Though they are Spanish, the islands are actually closer to Africa.

They are situated just off Africa's north-west coast of Morocco. Which gives them their enviably warm climate and interesting sea life.

3. Their position creates the perfect marine environment

Thanks to the warm waters, and the influence from both the North Atlantic and the Mediterranean, the surrounding waters are perfect for a number of interesting and even endemic marine species. It is a popular place for diving and snorkelling thanks to the large amounts of fish, coral and invertebrates. But perhaps the most popular inhabitant is the endangered loggerhead turtle.

4. The 'Canary' Islands have nothing to do with tiny birds...

In fact, it's thought the name derives from the word for dog. The Latin Canariae Insulae literally translates as the 'Islands of Dogs'.

5. Canary birds are named after the islands and not the other way around.

The Atlantic Canary or the wild canary is native to the Canary Islands and is a small yellowish bird belonging to the finch family. It gets its name from its home. Canaries as we know them, the domestic canaries, have been bred since the 17th century, from the wild canaries, and can now be found in a range of colours.

6. So what's the relevance of the dogs?

There are several theories that may shed some light on why the 'Islands of Dogs' have been named as they are. One is that King Juba II named the islands after the large ferocious dogs spotted during the expedition he sent out in the 1st century. A second theory is that the large population of monk seals, or canis marinus (literally 'sea dogs' in Latin) were some of the islands' most distinguishing features to the ancient Romans, back when they were first introduced to the area.

7. It is still not completely certain where the name originated from...

The Guanches were the original inhabitants of the Canary Islands and it is thought that they could have worshiped dogs in a similar way to the Egyptian worship of the dog-headed god Anubis. It is thought that on Gran Canaria the inhabitants even called themselves the 'Canarii'. Even today the islands' coat of arms depicts two dogs.

8. There are two capital cities

The Canaries form an autonomous community and between the seven islands there are actually two capital cities: Santa Cruz in Tenerife and Las Palmas in Gran Canaria.

9. They are home to the highest point in Spain

Mount Teide is a volcano that is located on Tenerife. Not only is it technically Spain's highest peak, at 3,781 meters, but it's also the third highest island volcano in the world. And it remains active!

10. And a secret language spoken only by locals

Silbo Gomaro is a type of whistled speech spoken on the island of La Gomera. It is thought to have been bought over by early settlers and adopted by the indigenous Guanches. It adapted over time and now seems to be the only language of its kind taught in schools. Find out all about Silbo Gomero and La Gomera here.

Share this post:
Luci Ackers

Luci Ackers

Luci loves getting out and about for a good cycle ride or easy-going walks in the countryside, and thoroughly enjoyed the time she previously spent working for the National Trust. Her love of writing started from a young age and on rainy days nothing beats curling up in a secret corner with a good book.

This advertisement is issued by HPB Management Limited ("HPBM") registered at HPB House, Newmarket, Suffolk, CB8 8EH. HPBM is authorised and regulated by the Financial Conduct Authority and is the main UK agent and the property manager for HPB, issued by HPB Assurance Limited ("HPBA") registered in the Isle of Man and authorised by the Financial Services Authority there. The Trustee of HPB is HSBC Trustee (C.I.) Limited registered at HSBC House, Esplanade, St Helier, Jersey, JE1 1GT. The Securities Manager is Stanhope Capital LLP of 35 Portman Square, London, W1H 6LR.

Holders of policies issued by HPBA will not be protected by the Financial Services Compensation Scheme if the company becomes unable to meet its liabilities to them but Isle of Man compensation arrangements apply to new policies. No medical examination required. HPB is available exclusively through HPBM who will only charge for their services if you invest. HPBM promotes only HPB and is not independent of HPBA.

AS FEATURED IN The Telegraph BBC Daily Mail The Sunday Times